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What, Fasting!

It’s the newest diet and the best one for you at that.

What’s more it’s simple, fast, cheap and easy to do. No extra meal prep time, no special recipes, No extra shopping, and no washing up after it’s all over.

So, what’s the problem?

None i can see.

It’s the method Dr Jason Fung of Toronto in Canada uses to handle his kidney patients and help them lose weight, recover from diabetes and other conditions

It’s an epic story from a far away country and a time long ago.

But it tells of eternal truths, a legendary love that defied ancient tradition and deadly enemies and still inspires a nation. It tells a tale of love and hate, of honour, integrity and courage, of vicious intrigue and violent death in a world where people learn to smile at father murderers and sit with back stabbers.

And all set in the painted beauty of Korean palaces with their ancient, curving roof tops, wooden trellis panels, sliding doors and carved stone sculptures; court ladies who float in and out of scenes in long, elegant dresses all awhile the men, dressed in long flowing silk jackets over their trousers and high black horse hair hats covering their top knots, defend their territories, protect their loved ones and fight for freedom or for power.

The story of Dong Yi is based loosely on the lives of people who really lived in the times of the Joseon dynasty in Korea under the King, Sukjong, around the end of the seventeenth century. It is the story of a girl who rose from the lowest rank to become favourite concubine of the king, the most powerful ladies of the court despite her lowly start in life and the mother of the next King of Korea, a king who was exceptional in his time.

This story is told beautifully. It is fictionalised because little actual detail of these character’s lives was recorded at the time. Even so, many of the details of daily life, the landscape and culture are authentic. They are backed up by some amazing martial arts fights, elaborate court music scenes played on traditional Korean instruments, with entertaining dance displays from the palace dancing girls.

It is a story of freedom fighters, fighting back against oppression and evil, against injustice and the final triumph of good over evil.

Yet it is done with honour, without vicarious violence or soft porn love scences. All the more commendable!

It is a television series of 60 episodes, yet it is so gripping just through the skillful drama and story telling of the scriptwriter and director that many people who watched it could not stop until they had watched all 60 episodes. And quite a few went back to the beginning and have watched it over and over again.

It is a series that never stops giving from the incredible acting of Han Hyo-Joo as the legendary Dong Yi and Ji Jin-Hee as King Sukjong.

It is a surprising find on YouTube where you can find all 60 episodes with English subtitles or find on Netflix.

i wish you many hours of delightful viewing, tears and laughter and moments of beauty.

There is a doctor who herself had an illness,

Her illness was diagnosed as multiple sclerosis.

Because she was a doctor in a large hospital which specialised in multiple scleroris, she herself was in the position to receive all the best, the most modern treatments available for this disease in America.

Her physical condition continued to degerate till one day, her doctors warned her that she would soon be at the point of no return. She knew what this would mean. She would no longer be able to work to support herself or her young children, she would not be able to afford more medical care and eventually she would not even be able to look after herself physically.

Her situation was desperate.

Using her rmedical knowledge, she looked into all the medical research papers she could find to learn about her condition.

What happened next?

Language, Literacy and Education

One of the biggest recent changes in education has to do with how we learn to read and write and how this is taught in schools.

There have been many sweeping changes in our Western way of life introduced after the war.

Television arrived. People from one end of a country to the other listened to the same programs, watched the news, followed the soaps, loved and laughed at the same figures, together. And as they did, they began to talk and think and dress the same way. People moved into cities away from the countryside, schools got bigger and school budgets smaller.

One of the biggest and most profound changes to take place was to do with how our children are taught to read.

The tried and tested Phonics approach went out the window and kids were left floundering,

The result is that many children leave primary school unable to read properly.

Diane McGuinness tackles this head-on in her book “Why Children Can’t Read” And What We Can Do About It.

Her analysis of the changes in the education system in the English speaking world in recent generations is vital to understanding what went wrong and why.

Hers is not a narrow view. She compares the development of spoken language and the reading and writing systems developed in such different languages and cultures as Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Sumerian, Russian, Hindu, Arabic, Hebrew cultures, cultures both present and past and brings it together into a simple, logical system that works.

This is one of the most vital books you can read if you want to understand a key factor in development and continuing existence of our culture.

Being able to read and to write are vital skills in our modern world.

Individual prosperity and cultural richness are interdependent, built on a bedrock of language, spoken and written and read with understanding.

The Silk Road

The Silk Road has fascinated me ever since I first heard about it.

The ancient route across Europe and the Middle East, across Asia all the way to China.
Legendary Marco Polo travelled the road nearly a thousand years ago across lands that were unimaginable to those who lived at that time,

A journey on horse back, camel back and even yak, over snow-capped mountains and rocky passes, through deep valleys and wide open, vast deserts, stopping only at remote caravanserais for rest, water and some conversation. it’s a life so different to our western world today.

What was it like then? Joanna Lumley takes an adventure through time to show us a glimpse of life as it once was lived by so many, as it has been for hundreds of years before and still is for a few following their traditional way of life.

Our modern Western world has gone through many changes. We can see so much with the touch of button and a good internet connection that we can see it all sitting at home.

Is that the same as the smell of spice in the bazaar, the colours on the ceiling of the mosque, the feel of the handmade carpet.

Weston Price – A Man of Truth

When you look into how to take care of yourself and your health, there is an ocean of information out there. Where to start?

There are so many approaches and conflicting ideas, that it is hard to understand what works and who to believe. Wherever you look there are conflicts of interest.
Profit driven companies sell their breakfast cereals to children who love the taste. While the cereals are full of toxic weedkillers that the child consumes along with milk from cows pumped full of antibiotics.

Most doctors have little information about nutrition, it is not a part of their medical training, so when confronted by disease, they only have one route to take — the drug route.

So who knows what actually works or used to work before the scene got muddled by men with dollar signs in their eyes.

Diabetes. It is a scourge of modern life — a lifestyle disease.

It’s not a broken bone which hopefully can be fixed and you carry on with your life after a few weeks or months.

It’s not like having a baby which is a normal part of life for women.

It’s a condition that is relentless, progressive — and expensive.

It costs billions in direct health care costs in the UK alone.

Factor in the cost of a lifetime of multiple drugs after diagnosis, of annual screenings and monitoring patients in doctor’s surgeries and hospitals up and down the country.

Factor in the rising rates of people developing Type 2 diabetes as they grow older into middle age onwards.

Factor in the earlier and earlier ages at which Type 2 diabetes is now being found and being diagnosed. It’s now much more common in young adults and appearing even children.

It leads to complications. It brings about other medical issues which in turn are costly and life changing — leg ulcers, leading to gangrene and leg amputations, progressive blindness, kidney failure, impotence to list a few of the common and more severe ones.

It can increase the risk and occurrence of heart problems and strokes, of blood pressure problems and cholesterol issues. And those in turn add to the list of medications a person can be prescribed by their doctor. Not to mention the side effects that medications have.

It has been said Diabetes is incurable.

And for the pharmaceutical industry, the life time dependence on the drugs and other medical supplies such as testing kits, syringes to inject insulin or draw blood samples for lab work, dressings for leg ulcers, creams and ointments for open wounds, the training of nurse practitioners, the production costs of supplies, equipment such as blood testing meters for patients on insulin, the scientists and technicians employed to produce all the drugs and paraphernalia needed — it spirals into a mind-boggling demand on health care budgets and it has to be said, health profits for the pharmaceutical industry.

Considering that for the most part, doctors do not study about nutrition and its relationship to health as part of their medical degrees, very few look beyond the conventional approach they are taught in university, to use a drug or medicine to get a result when presented with ill patient.

However, a medical researcher in Nottingham University, Professor Ron Taylor asked some different questions and took a different approach. He evolved a therapy based on a diet approach to help the body to resolve the issues which were contributing to patient’s diabetes. He achieved success with his program.

Another doctor, Michael Mosely, well-known from his work with the BBC as a presenter, was shocked to be given a personal diagnosis of diabetes. He didn’t want to start taking drugs or medication to handle his condition. He found the program of Professor Taylor, followed it and resolved his diabetes condition within a very short time without the need of drugs or medication.

Dr Michael Mosely has written a book about his experience popularising the pioneering work done by Professor Taylor, in the book “The Blood Sugar Diet”. It’s tough. There are many reviews online of people who are successful practitioners of the methods outlined in the book, who got off their diabetes medications, and got the all clear from their doctor.

If you want to do more, you can buy the book from Amazon or find out about the program here:
thebloodsugardiet.com/

All the best and I wish you every success if this applies to you or someone you know.

Aileen

Treasure Trove in the Public Domain

Public Domain.

So, what is it?

Technically anything out of copyright has passed into the public domain. There are slightly different laws about copyright in different countries relating to copyright. The general purpose of copyright however, is to protect the individual who created a work of art, an invention, a piece of music or some other product so that other people cannot profit from his or her work until he or she has had a reasonable chance to or claim it as their own.

Public domain is defined in “Whatis.com” as

“Public domain is a designation for content that is not protected by any copyright law or other restriction and may be freely copied, shared, altered and republished by anyone. The designation means, essentially, that the content belongs to the community at large. Copyright restrictions vary among types of content and different countries.”

There are limitless amounts of material in the public domain, available for recycling and reusing, reinventing or recreating into new, exciting and different forms.

Splurge on it.

Essential Oils for Health and Wellbeing

Essential oils have a role to play in preventing ill health
and disease — always the best option– or encouraging our bodies to heal and recover faster if disease has set in.

Antibiotics have become less effective in recent years leading to fears that hospital operations may be affected or prevented due to the existence of bugs which can resist the strongest of antibiotics we now have.

There are on record some strains of bacteria which are completely resistant to all known antibiotics, meaning that the usual relied-upon medical treatment for patients who contract diseases caused by those bacteria won’t work. We have relied on antibiotics for so long and so heavily that we have forgotten earlier solutions and not developed new ones.

In the plant kingdom, living plants have developed the ability to produce chemicals within the plant which can help that individual plant to withstand attacks from insects, different kinds of fungus, bacteria and virus attacks.

Some of these uses have been known and used by our grandmothers, by traditional medical herbalists and healers down through the ages. Many of them have fallen out of use and even out of living memory in some cases.

To give some examples, from the neighbouring country of France a friend who grew up in Paris, told me how his mother treated colds; whenever he began to catch a cold, his mother cut a slice of bread, buttered it, spread it with finely chopped, raw garlic and gave it to him to eat. That was it.

A bit further south in Provence, another child told how when the winter season came and colds and flu were going around, if he was sick in bed, his mother would put a pot of water on the back of the stove, load it up with lavender and rosemary and let the beautifully scented vapour diffuse through the whole house. This was the traditional treatment in his part of the country.

This fragrant solutions sounds wonderfully rustic country cottage and quaint in our modern world of antiseptics and chemical sanitizers.

So, is there any scientific evidence to back up such an activity?

The skin is our first line of defence. It covers all the organs in our bodies to protect them from toxins and infections.

In the cases of burns, open wounds are a break in this protective barrier. However, they cannot be covered with bandages or coverings, leaving the layers below exposed to airborne bacteria.

Scientific studies done recently have shown that certain combinations of essential oils diffused into the atmosphere can dramatically lower the amount of infections in burn wounds.

Lavender is one such oil. It has been found lavender promotes healing while keeping wounds from developing infection. Another very effective oil is geranium oil. One of the strongest of oils is oil of oregano, the same herb we love to put on our pizzas and our Italian recipes. Perhaps the strongest essential oils is cinnamon,

A Colourful Change in Afghanistan

This short video from the BBC caught my eye.

A change taking place in Afghanistan in an unexpected direction shows a colourful scene in Afghanistan

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/video_and_audio/must_see/41754605/rainbow-paint-job-to-cheer-up-people-in-kabul?SThisFB

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